Science Fiction Audiences: Watching Star Trek and Doctor Who (Popular Fictions Series)

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Press: Routledge (April 26, 1995)
Publication Date:1995-4
ISBN:9780415061414
Author Name:Tulloch, John; Jenkins, Henry;
Pages:307
Language:English
Edition:0th Edition

Content

Science Fiction Audiences examines the astounding popularity of two television "institutions" - the series Doctor Who and ^Star Trek. 
Both of these programmes have survived cancellation and acquired an following that continues to grow.
The book is based on over ten years of research including interviews with fans and followers of the series.
In that period, though the fans may have changed, and ways of studying them as "audiences" may have also changed, the programmes have endured intact, with Star Trek for example now in its fourth television incarnation.
John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins dive into the rich fan culture surrounding the two series, exploring issues such as queer identity, fan meanings, teenage love of science fiction, and genre expectations.
They encompass the perspectives of a vast population of fans and followers throughout Britain, Australia and the US, who will continue the debates contained in the book, along with those who will examine the historically changing range of audience theory it presents.
and continue to attract a huge community of fans and followers.
Doctor Who has appeared in nine different guises and Star Trek is now approaching its fourth television incarnation.Science Fiction Audiences examines the continuing popularity of two television 'institutions' of our time through their fans and followers.
Through dialogue with fans and followers of Star Trek and Dr Who in the US, Britain and Australia, John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins ask what it is about the two series that elicits such strong and active responses from their audiences.
Is it their particular intervention into the SF genre? Their expression of peculiarly 'American' and 'British' national cultures.
Their ideologies and visions of the future, or their conceptions of science and technology? Science Fiction Audiences responds to a rich fan culture which encompasses debates about fan aesthetics, teenage attitudes to science fiction, queers and Star Trek, and ideology and pleasure in Doctor Who.
It is a book written both for fans of the two series, who will be able to continue their debates in its pages, and for students of media and cultural studies, offering a historical overview of audience theory in a fascinating synthesis of text, context and audience study.

From the Back Cover

Science Fiction Audiences responds to a rich fan culture which encompasses debates about fan aesthetics, teenage attitudes to science fiction, queers and Star Trek, and ideology and pleasure in Doctor Who. 
It is a book both for fans of the series, who will be able to continue their debates in its pages, and for students of media and cultural studies, offering a historical overview of audience theory in a fascinating synthesis of text, context and audience study.

About the Author

John Tulloch id Professor of Cultural Studies at Charles Stuart University, New South Wales, Australia. 
Henry Jenkins is Director of Film and Media at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Humor & Entertainment,Television,Shows,Textbooks,Communication & Journalism,Media Studies,Humanities,Performing Arts,Film & Television


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Comment

 
 

Comment List (Total:3)

  •     This is not a novel, it's a commentary, and not that well written. I found it boring and would return it if I could.
  •     Fun book.
  •     An academic, though interesting look at the opinions of various viewers in regards to the world's two most famous sci-fi television shows, Doctor Who and Star Trek. The Doctor Who section explores viewer reactions to (if I'm not mistaken) the Jon Pertwee story "The Monster of Peladon", an odd choice as it is not generally considered one of the more popular Doctor Who adventures. The story was chosen for analysis as it features strong social and political commentary, including the subjects of worker's rights, unionization, and women's liberation. As the book is a scholarly look at the average science-fiction viewer, it tends to be somewhat dry and difficult to follow at times. Overall an interesting oddity, though probably not for the average reader.

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